Shoreline Step-Up Competition
       
     
 MJA set out to pursue new typologies in the affordable housing market through the step up challenge competition by Landcorp. With an initial open invitation to submit a single conceptual panel, MJA successfully progressed through to stages 2 and 3 out of an initial 47 entries. A neatly packaged, conservative brief targeted the stereotypes associated with “affordable” housing in Australia. The main brief asked entrants to challenge the commonly negative connotations by providing a new packaged form through a chosen building type that captured affordability, innovation, and a high level of design quality.  MJA’s approach to the staged competition was explored in partnership with Handle Property Group and EMCO Building Company, alongside several consultants and contributors. The submission, aptly named  Dirty Word,  fought to challenge the stereotypes attached to affordability, by providing a new approach to multi-residential communal living through transparent communication between designer, builder and developer to provide a series of cost-saving considerations in design, construction, through to post-occupancy in low ongoing maintenance.    Stage 3’s development provided inbuilt flexibility in 24 titled lots contained within 20 dwellings, spread over 4 storeys with an overall saving of 65% in greenhouse gas emissions. Separate lot attachments allow homeowners the opportunity to up-size, downsize and adjust their home over time, with consideration for expansion, division of studio and home, capped services for future bathrooms and flexible purchase options for carbays. Every idea explored in  Dirty Word  considers both the functional and performance-based aspects of the development, with the final submission incorporating a palette of pre-finished, robust, coastal-friendly materials, flexible interiors, and sustainable applications to communal gardens, energy and water use. MJA’s pursuits in new initiatives argued that affordability no longer needs to be considered a dirty word.  *Artwork in the image above by Jordie Hewitt
       
     
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Shoreline Step-Up Competition
       
     
Shoreline Step-Up Competition

Type: Multi-Residential
Location: Shoreline Development, North Coogee
Status: Stage 3 Finalist (Top 4)

Stage 3 Competition Team: Architect - MJA Studio | Developer - Handle Property Group | Developer - Handle Property Group | Builder - EMCO | Landscape - CAPA Architects | Electrical - CDEP Engineering | Hydraulic - Tim Peach | Structural - FORTH Engineering | BCA - Resolve Group | Acoustic - ND Engineering | Fire - Defire | Energy - Fini Sustainability | Life Cycle Design - eTool | Mechanical - Lucid Consulting |

 

 MJA set out to pursue new typologies in the affordable housing market through the step up challenge competition by Landcorp. With an initial open invitation to submit a single conceptual panel, MJA successfully progressed through to stages 2 and 3 out of an initial 47 entries. A neatly packaged, conservative brief targeted the stereotypes associated with “affordable” housing in Australia. The main brief asked entrants to challenge the commonly negative connotations by providing a new packaged form through a chosen building type that captured affordability, innovation, and a high level of design quality.  MJA’s approach to the staged competition was explored in partnership with Handle Property Group and EMCO Building Company, alongside several consultants and contributors. The submission, aptly named  Dirty Word,  fought to challenge the stereotypes attached to affordability, by providing a new approach to multi-residential communal living through transparent communication between designer, builder and developer to provide a series of cost-saving considerations in design, construction, through to post-occupancy in low ongoing maintenance.    Stage 3’s development provided inbuilt flexibility in 24 titled lots contained within 20 dwellings, spread over 4 storeys with an overall saving of 65% in greenhouse gas emissions. Separate lot attachments allow homeowners the opportunity to up-size, downsize and adjust their home over time, with consideration for expansion, division of studio and home, capped services for future bathrooms and flexible purchase options for carbays. Every idea explored in  Dirty Word  considers both the functional and performance-based aspects of the development, with the final submission incorporating a palette of pre-finished, robust, coastal-friendly materials, flexible interiors, and sustainable applications to communal gardens, energy and water use. MJA’s pursuits in new initiatives argued that affordability no longer needs to be considered a dirty word.  *Artwork in the image above by Jordie Hewitt
       
     

MJA set out to pursue new typologies in the affordable housing market through the step up challenge competition by Landcorp. With an initial open invitation to submit a single conceptual panel, MJA successfully progressed through to stages 2 and 3 out of an initial 47 entries. A neatly packaged, conservative brief targeted the stereotypes associated with “affordable” housing in Australia. The main brief asked entrants to challenge the commonly negative connotations by providing a new packaged form through a chosen building type that captured affordability, innovation, and a high level of design quality.

MJA’s approach to the staged competition was explored in partnership with Handle Property Group and EMCO Building Company, alongside several consultants and contributors. The submission, aptly named Dirty Word, fought to challenge the stereotypes attached to affordability, by providing a new approach to multi-residential communal living through transparent communication between designer, builder and developer to provide a series of cost-saving considerations in design, construction, through to post-occupancy in low ongoing maintenance.  

Stage 3’s development provided inbuilt flexibility in 24 titled lots contained within 20 dwellings, spread over 4 storeys with an overall saving of 65% in greenhouse gas emissions. Separate lot attachments allow homeowners the opportunity to up-size, downsize and adjust their home over time, with consideration for expansion, division of studio and home, capped services for future bathrooms and flexible purchase options for carbays. Every idea explored in Dirty Word considers both the functional and performance-based aspects of the development, with the final submission incorporating a palette of pre-finished, robust, coastal-friendly materials, flexible interiors, and sustainable applications to communal gardens, energy and water use. MJA’s pursuits in new initiatives argued that affordability no longer needs to be considered a dirty word.

*Artwork in the image above by Jordie Hewitt

shoreline_4.jpg
       
     
shoreline_7.jpg
       
     
shoreline_14.jpg
       
     
shoreline_5.jpg
       
     
shoreline_10.jpg
       
     
shoreline_2.jpg
       
     
shoreline_16.jpg